Category Archives: Uncategorized

Gibraltar FAQs and more!

Tired of Gibsplaining every time Gibraltar hits the headlines?  Fed up of the constant, basic errors you see or hear about everything to do with the Rock and its people?

Then here’s a handy FAQ with some key information that you can cut out and keep or better still, share with anyone who might benefit from reading it.  (Document courtesy of Ilana Benady and Helen Wade.)

 

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“Stranger Danger” – shall we tell the children?

Stranger2A friend of mine shared this post which offered an insightful and thought-provoking view on why parents should not teach children about “stranger danger,”  It’s a dilemma every parent faces: at what age do you progress from the softly-softly, safety advice given to toddlers and young children to tips on how to stay safe in a wider context with full knowledge of what could happen if you don’t? There’s some good pointers in the post – It’s worth a read.

 

 

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Singing for Pleasure, always!

Have a listen to some of the new recordings from Sing for Pleasure’s Summer School in August 2014.

Some wonderful arrangements from their songbooks as well as the premiere of Oli Tarney’s sublime, Magnificat.  It was a privilege to be one of the soprano voices on these recordings.  

Photo copyright: Sing for Pleasure

Photo copyright: Sing for Pleasure

Photo copyright: Hilary Griffiths

Photo copyright: Hilary Griffiths

From the SfP website:  Recorded excerpts from the first performance of Oliver Tarney’s Magnificat, from Summer School 2014. SfP plans to publish it, record it and make it available for choirs to perform in the future. It is a hugely varied, interesting and approachable piece!

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Keep the beat, improve your language skills

Here’s an interesting article I’m reproducing here, courtesy of the BBC.

Moving in time to a steady beat is closely linked to better language skills, a study suggests.

MoveToTheBeat
People who performed better on rhythmic tests also showed enhanced neural responses to speech sounds. The researchers suggest that practising music could improve other skills, particularly speech. In the Journal of Neuroscience, the authors argue that rhythm is an integral part of language. “We know that moving to a steady beat is a fundamental skill not only for music performance but one that has been linked to language skills,” said Nina Kraus, of Northwestern University in Illinois.

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